Money and finance articles

Find tons of information about money in the articles below.
  • The art of bartering in the modern age - Back in the times before established currency forms, people would mostly trade a good or service that they specialized in for another that they didn’t specialize in (but needed). Unfortunately, somewhere along the line this fell out of popularity especially in modern times. I, for one, would love to see bartering make a comeback in a HUGE way. 
  • Holiday Spending Guide - Tips to help you keep Christmas expenses under control.
  • 5 Tips for building up savings - Americans are finding more satisfaction from saving money than spending money, according to The Gallup Economy and Personal Finance poll. But the poll also found that people are not acting on this desire. So how can we become savers? Here are some tips.
  • You can improve your credit score - here's how! - Most people are aware that their credit report is a determining factor in whether or not they get a car loan, a home loan, or a credit card. And that their credit score can impact the interest rates they are offered if they qualify for those types of credit. However, many don’t realize that their credit report can impact a great many other things in their lives.
  • What a financial pro learned about money from her parents - I absolutely credit my parents for my money know-how, but what people have to understand is that it isn’t always what you SAY but what you DO and model for your family.
  • How to fight fair to resolve conflict - How you spend your money is just one of the things on which you and your spouse will disagree. You are bound to have different viewpoints about a variety of topics, so it’s important to learn how to deal with your differences respectfully and effectively.
  • How new agency credit reporting rules impact you - The country’s three major credit reporting agencies have announced plans to overhaul how they collect information about consumers and how they interact with consumers seeking to correct reporting errors.
  • Change your perspective on money to change your financial life - There’s an classic optical illusion that features a drawing of an elderly woman or a young woman depending on how you look at it. The difference is in how you look at it.
  • What a school bus can teach you about finances - When people walk into my office, they may notice the little, bright yellow die cast school bus prominently displayed on my bookcase. It sits there right in my line of sight, and that of my clients, for a reason. Every now and again someone will notice it, smile, and ask me what it is doing there. 
  • 10 money habits that are robbing you blind - Dropping bad money habits makes it easier to power up your financial life. Following are 10 bad habits, and tips for ending them.
  • Cyber-shopping and a determination to save money - I prefer to shop online. I tend to shop when there are specials and free shipping to avoid the extra costs, and I also prefer that there be free return shipping or a brick-and-mortar store nearby so that, if I need to, I can return items without paying to send them back.
  • Money challenge: Pull and "Alicia" for one month and see how much money you save - In my circle of family and friends you will often hear the words “pull an Alicia.” When I first heard that phrase I wasn’t sure if I should be flattered or slightly offended. 
  • 6 common-sense ways to deal with money problems - The answer to most money problems is a lot more basic than you might think and there are steps that everyone can take to get back on the right track.
  • Looking for some deals online? Try these websites and apps - Think back to a time when having an extra $1,000 would have made a major difference in the circumstance you were facing. How would the situation have played out differently if you had $1,000 to draw upon? 
  • How does a certified financial professional respond to job loss in her family? - Two weeks ago we were notified that my husband’s employer, a large printing company , was going to close the local plant in 60 days. 280 people will be out of work. 
  • Harassment by collection agencies: what are your rights? - If you owe money and collection agencies are calling day and night, you should know that federal law requires that 3rd party collection agencies treat you fairly.
  • Why you need a home inventory … now - It’s a lot easier to take stock of your insurance coverage and possessions now rather than after a fire has gutted your home, or spring floods have set it afloat, or a wind storm has blown it all away. There’s enough to think about without having to try to remember everything you owned once the insurance adjuster arrives. 
  • 9 tips for single parents heading to college -  Making it through college can be a challenge for any of us—add to that the responsibility of being a single parent and college can be especially demanding. Here's some advice for helping single parents be successful students and parents.
  • Morning coffee and keeping an eye out for credit fraud - Most mornings upon waking I hear, “Coffee, coffee. I need coffee.” Next I hear the sound of the coffee grinder followed by the coffee brewing. But recently we awoke to a different coffee calling.
  • Nine steps to dealing With medical debt - A broken bone, mental health therapy, a long-term illness, a car accident, a premature baby. All of these situations—and so many more unexpected ones—can land a family in medical debt.
  • Are you feeling left behind ... in life? - The feeling of being “behind” can mean different things to different people. But how do you shake that feeling and become content with where you are in your life?
  • 5 tips to pare down your Christmas list without looking cheap - The holidays can be a social landmine. Rather than risk offending someone, we often go overboard and end up with a gift list nearly as long as Santa’s.
  • 8 ways to find extra cash for Christmas expenses - Many people are entering the largest shopping season of the year financially ill-prepared. For some, the ghosts of Christmases past are still haunting them in the form of unmanageable credit card debt.
  • Ten things you should know about identity theft - While some identity thieves focus on getting our credit cards and maxing them out before you even realize they’re missing, an increasing number are using one piece of information about you–– often a credit card number––in order to steal your entire identity.
  • 6 steps to budget your way to your financial goals - Regardless of whether you want to save more, spend less, or finally take that trip to Tahiti, a budget can get you there.
  • Groceries: How Much Should You Spend? - Is coming up with a consistent monthly food budget making you crazy? Or guilty? Or hungry? Jane DeLaney, the founder of E-Mealz, puts things in perspective by sharing her experience with creating a food budget.
  • Credit score myths and mistakes when purchasing a home - Credit scores are a major factor in a home purchase. Because of this, it is important to understand some of the credit scoring mistakes and myths that you may be unaware of.
  • 3 tips to raise your credit score fast - You’re planning on buying a house in a few months and want to do everything possible to raise your credit score before you apply for a mortgage. What are the three most important things you can do today for a higher credit score tomorrow?
  • Should You File Taxes Yourself? - During the first couple months of every year, I am frequently asked, “Where should I go to get my taxes done?” And I usually respond with the question, “Have you tried filing your return on your own?”
  • What is That Daily Specialty Coffee Really Costing You? - Do you stop on the way to work to buy coffee or do you buy that occasional specialty coffee drink? If you were to purchase one specialty coffee drink at an average price of $4.57 (including tax) five times a week, you would spend approximately $1188 per year.
  • Consequences of Overspending on the Holidays - Many shoppers lose sight of the fact that regardless of the price, a bargain isn’t a smart purchase if it compromises a person’s overall financial health.